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Human-animal relationships. (Vergil MS Vat. lat. 3867--Romanus. Folio 44, verso.)
Highlights of this Course

This course is designed to challenge and encourage you, as veterinary students, to explore the relationships between population health and public health, animal health and human health, and clinical and population-based health practice. If we are successful, the process of exploration will continue throughout your graduate school education and training so that when you graduate, you will be better equipped to define your role as a veterinarian, and that of the veterinary profession, in public health.

This course focuses less on memorizing facts and more on understanding concepts, less on finding the right answer and more on applying critical thinking. The life of an individual animal may not depend on what you do here, but in the real world your contributions may help to shape the future direction of Veterinary Public Health and the health of animal and human populations.

Course Description

This course is designed to challenge and encourage you, as veterinary students, to explore the relationships between population health and public health, animal health and human health, and clinical and population-based health practice. In general, we will confine our discussions in this course to veterinary public health in the United States except when it easier to illustrate a point or concept using an example from elsewhere.

We veterinarians do not typically speak the language of public health. To that end, I've integrated two frameworks into the course this year. The first is the Ten Essential Public Health Services (EPHS), the framework that currently defines what public health does in the United States. The second is the model Public Health/Preventive Medicine Curriculum of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine (ACVPM), prepared by Dr. Vicky Fogelman for the AVMA. That curriculum comprises six broad topics - food safety, zoonoses, foreign animal diseases, environmental health, community health, and epidemiology and biostatistics. Each course topic includes one EPHS and related sections of the ACVPM. I've chosen to illustrate each course topic using examples relevant to the practice of veterinary medicine, and these examples range from E. coli 0157:H7 prevention and control to Hurricane Katrina's aftermath to the development of administrative policies and laws to the delivery of rabies vaccinations in the US and less industrialized countries.

This course makes generous use of references that are in the public domain, often on government websites. Other internal references will also be used.

Please note that the course as presented here does not contain the full content of the course as taught at Tufts. The included content is based on material the Tufts faculty and instructors choose to include, as well as factors such as content preparation, software compatibility, and intellectual property and copyright restrictions.
Course Faculty
Joann Lindenmayer
Course Length
16 Hours
Level
Graduate - 2nd year