Tufts OpenCourseware
Search
Author: Fulcrum Institute Development Team

Electromagnetic Waves

What are electromagnetic waves?    

Both the waves in the flag and the ocean waves are waves that you can see. There are other kinds of waves (such as sound or electromagnetic). We cannot see these waves, but we experience them every day. Like ocean waves, sound waves need a medium to travel through. Sound can travel through air because air is made of molecules. These molecules carry the sound waves by bumping into each other, like Dominoes knocking each other over. Sound can travel through anything made of molecules - even water! There is no sound in space because there are no molecules there to transmit the sound waves.

Electromagnetic waves are unlike sound waves because they do not need molecules to travel. This means that electromagnetic waves can travel through air and solid materials - but they can also travel through empty space. This is why astronauts on spacewalks use radios to communicate. Radio waves are a type of electromagnetic wave.

Electromagnetic Waves have different wavelengths

When you listen to the radio, watch TV, or cook dinner in a microwave oven, you are using electromagnetic waves.

Radio waves, television waves, and microwaves are all types of electromagnetic waves. They only differ from each other in wavelength. Wavelength is the distance between one wave crest to the next.

http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/dictionary/Wavelength.html

Waves in the electromagnetic spectrum vary in size from very long radio waves the size of buildings, to very short gamma-rays smaller than the size of the nucleus of an atom.

http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov/science-processes/electromagnetic-diagram/

Visible light waves are the only electromagnetic waves we can see. We see these waves as the colors of the rainbow. Each color has a different wavelength. Red has the longest wavelength and violet has the shortest wavelength. When all the waves are seen together, they make white light.

 

http://science.hq.nasa.gov/kids/imagers/ems/visible.html

Infrared Radiation

Infrared light lies between the visible and microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Infrared light has a range of wavelengths, just like visible light has wavelengths that range from red light to violet. The longer, far infrared wavelengths are about the size of a pin head and the shorter, near infrared ones are the size of cells, or are microscopic.

Far infrared waves are thermal. In other words, we experience this type of infrared radiation every day in the form of heat! The heat that we feel from sunlight, a fire, a radiator or a warm sidewalk is infrared. The temperature-sensitive nerve endings in our skin can detect the difference between inside body temperature and outside skin temperature.

Infrared light is even used to heat food sometimes - special lamps that emit thermal infrared waves are often used in fast food restaurants!

How can we "see" using the Infrared?

Since the primary source of infrared radiation is heat or thermal radiation, any object that has a temperature radiates in the infrared. Even objects that we think of as being very cold, such as an ice cube, emit infrared. When an object is not quite hot enough to radiate visible light, it will emit most of its energy in the infrared. For example, hot charcoal may not give off light but it does emit infrared radiation that we feel as heat. The warmer the object, the more infrared radiation it emits.

http://science.hq.nasa.gov/kids/imagers/ems/infrared.html

Humans, at normal body temperature, radiate most strongly in the infrared at a wavelength of about 10 microns. (A micron is the term commonly used in astronomy for a micrometer or one millionth of a meter.) This image (which is courtesy of the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at CalTech), shows a man holding up a lighted match! Which parts of this image do you think have the warmest temperature? How does the temperature of this man's glasses compare to the temperature of his hand?

To make infrared pictures like the one above, we can use special cameras and film that detect differences in temperature, and then assign different brightnesses or false colors to them. This provides a picture that our eyes can interpret.

http://science.hq.nasa.gov/kids/imagers/ems/infrared.html

The image above (courtesy of SE-IR Corporation, Goleta, CA) shows a cat in the infrared. The orange areas are the warmest and the white-blue areas are the coldest. This image gives us a different view of a familiar animal as well as information that we could not get from a visible light picture.

Many things besides people and animals emit infrared light - the Earth, the Sun, and far away things like stars and galaxies do also!


Excerpted from:

The Electromagnetic Spectrum. NASA Interactive Multimedia Adventures for Grade School Education Using Remote Sensing Program. - http://imagers.gsfc.nasa.gov/ems/